Doing what they can for the war

Before women were on the battlefield, they played an important role

Whether on the battlefield or on the home front, women have been involved in supporting war efforts since the beginning of time.

In honor of Veterans Day, I’m re-blogging Ben Marks’ post highlighting how women around the world were utilized in propaganda posters in support of the Great War.

A heart-felt thank you to all the men and women who throughout the ages have put themselves out there to protect us all.

Women and Children: The Secret Weapons of World War I Propaganda Posters

November 6th, 2013

WillYouGo

 
JoanArc

Haskell Coffin produced this image for the U.S. Treasury Department in 1918.

Armistice Day is a time to reflect upon that defining moment at the end of World War I, at 11 a.m. on November 11, 1918, when soldiers stopped shooting at each other along Europe’s Western Front. At its close, most observers assumed that nothing would ever match the “Great War” for its sheer volumes of death and destruction, and for decades after, people around the world stopped whatever they were doing at that hour to observe two minutes of silence in a mute echo of the quiet that must have blanketed the battlefield. As the world soon learned, the sadly quaint practice of holding one’s tongue for 120 seconds, once a year, would not be enough: After World War II, the holiday’s name was changed in the United States to Veterans Day, while countries in the British Commonwealth observed Remembrance Day.

Read more and see all 24 posters …