The value of a blog tour?

RunningWhile I was running fast on the ground to launch my historical novel Go Away Home in Iowa, I was also zipping through cyberspace on a virtual book tour that included 15 blog visits.

In the course of the tour, I participated in two author interviews, shared my thoughts on efficient “just in time” historical research and my inspiration for writing the book, offered my ideas for networking online to promote a book, and made copies of Go Away Home available for giveaways.

A virtual book tour was a new marketing approach for me. My goals were to share my book more broadly and to garner reviews.

Here’s what the reviewers had to say:

Patty @ Broken Teepee: (4.5 stars) “This is a well written story about a young woman, Liddie, who was born on a farm in Iowa at the turn of the 20th century. I felt myself quite engrossed in the story and found it very hard to put down. It wasn’t all sweetness and light and Liddie learns some hard lessons as she grows up. Ms. Bodensteiner has a very strong feel for the era and its mores and I would love to follow the characters further.”

Kathryn @ A Bibliotaph’s Reviews (4 stars): “Bodensteiner draws on familial history within this tale, and her writing leaves the reader with a sense of homesickness for one’s family. Her writing style is detailed but not in a manner that overloads the reader with information. She often leaves them guessing as to what will come next. I highly recommend this book.”

PC @ Writing Whims (5 stars): “The research is impeccable in this novel. Ms. Brodensteiner has proven herself as an exceptional storyteller in her first novel. If you enjoy rich characters and historical fiction, you won’t be disappointed in Go Away Home.

Lauralee @ History from a Woman’s Perspective (4 stars): “Overall, the book is about family, friendship, love, loss, sacrifice, choices, and hope. It is also about a person’s quest for home. The pace of the novel is easygoing, reminiscent of a leisurely Sunday morning. However, it is pleasing and you care what happens to Liddie. I recommend this book to anyone interested in early 20th century America, life in the rural Midwest, and those who face tough choices in their own lives.”

Kathleen @ CelticLady’s Reviews (5 stars): “Go Away Home is written about the daily struggles within a family during a tough time in our American history. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I am not sure if there is to be a sequel, but I think it would be interesting to see what happens to Liddie in the future. I highly recommend this book!”

Jorie @ Jorie Loves a Story: “Bodensteiner reaches back into the classical story-telling grace of giving her characters an encouragement of innocence and an appreciation for learning through their choices. She … fills … the novel with realistic truths and a backdrop of honesty that is refreshing to find in the historical fiction genre. This is a story that knits into your heart as you soak inside its core, giving you a firm realisation that you’ve found a family you’re emotionally connected too. I shall not soon forget this novel and I cannot wait to read more by the author.

Ashley @ Closed The Cover (4 stars): “Liddie is an incredible character, which is essential in a book like this as she is the primary focus of the novel. The book centers around her; her hopes, goals, dreams, passions and eventual understanding. She is everything a reader would expect from a young girl as she is naive, hopeful and passionate yet as the story progresses she grows and understands. Readers will find themselves quickly and fully engrossed in her story. Liddie’s coming-of-age story is remarkable and will take readers on a very emotional journey. In the end Liddie must choose that which is the most important to her and decide on what it is that makes life worth living. This is a beautiful book. Wonderful, lovely and a great read!

There’s no question a blog tour is a lot of work for the author. Posts to write, staying in touch with comments, sharing the posts across social media. I arrived at the end of the month as winded as if I’d run to all those places in real time. I also conclude the month satisfied that the investment in a professional tour company was well made. Kudos to Amy Bruno at Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours for setting up the tour and managing it so well.

I couldn’t have asked for more in the reviews. Some of these reviewers expressed interest in a sequel; other readers have, too. A sequel wasn’t in my head when I wrote this novel, but not the seed has been planted. We’ll have to see if it grows. Overall,  the success of the tour was summed up for me in the comment a reader left: “I’m seeing this book everywhere.”

Have you picked up a copy of Go Away Home yet? If these reviews spark your interest, here are links: Print – Createspace           Kindle – ebook

Feeling the love – Making the most of local book launch events

As I prepared for the launch of my historical novel Go Away Home, I wondered how much the world had changed. Since publishing my memoir as a paperback in 2008, ebooks have proliferated, social media connects the world. Would local launches even be relevant?

Now that the local events are over, I can say the basic strategies of “events, placement and promotion” I blogged about a couple of years ago for doing local launch events are still sound. I’ve refined a few things, and I’m basking in the glow of a successful launch.

I scheduled four events – three in eastern Iowa where I grew up, an area that serves as the setting for much of the novel, and one in Des Moines where I live now.

Libraries, Bookstores & the Historical Society

Preston book Launch 1

Sharing the history of memoir and fiction at the Preston Public Library.

The library in my hometown hosted a large event where I reconnected with friends who enjoyed my memoir and remembered our family fondly. This was my first change to try out my “Writing History” talk. The book talk and Q&A lasted an hour and a half. Another library event in the next county allowed me to connect with more people and maximize my time in the area.

The Jackson County Historical Society – one of my research resources – invited me to speak at their annual meeting. I refined the talk, read a couple of short sections from the book, and shared tidbits of Iowa history I’d learned in doing research for the novel.

Connecting with friends at a launch party for "Go Away Home"

Connecting with friends at a launch party for “Go Away Home”

In Des Moines, my event was at Beaverdale Books, an independent bookstore that was the first to carry my memoir. This event drew a wonderful cross section of people from my life: neighborhood, church, public relations, reading and writing, plus people I didn’t know who’d come to the event because they’d heard about it in the media. For this event, I pared the book talk to 15-20 minutes. Talking with friends old and new, signing books, enjoying a glass of wine. Wonderful!

Where to buy books?

In addition to having books at the events, I made sure books were available in advance of the events and the media promotion.

My home counties are largely rural, so I placed books with the local pharmacies and the historical society, in addition to the one small bookstore. Many people came to the events having already read the book. In Des Moines, I made sure both independent bookstores had copies on their shelves.

Unlike when my memoir was published, with the launch of Go Away Home, I was already live on Amazon, and Barnes & Noble was able to order.

Getting the word out

My marketing background kicks into overdrive for things like this. I created a media kit and made it available on my website. I started contacting media more than a month in advance of the events. This was important for two reasons. In the rural counties, some of the newspapers are weeklies so the deadlines are further out. In a large city like Des Moines, the competition for space is great and the media book time weeks in advance.

The overall news hook of a woman following her dream is a theme from the novel that is playing out in my life as I write and publish my books. I also added other hooks I hoped would appeal to the media: local author, historical fiction set in Iowa, centenary of WWI, successful memoir.  The scheduled events gave the news urgency – a reason to run the story NOW.

I also increased the sophistication of my email marketing. I segmented my email list, sending out “save the date” and reminder emails to people in each market.

The results?

  • The combined events drew in close to 200 people
  • The major newspapers in Jackson and Clinton Counties carried features in print and online editions. I was interviewed live on radio.
  • In Des Moines, the Des Moines Register included my event in the Sunday Arts & Entertainment section “Pick 6” column; I was interviewed on KCCI-TV at noon, and the Business Record focused on me in their e-newsletter and online editions.
  • Momentum. The buzz around these events has led to scheduling other events. People are reading the book and talking about it on social media. Reviews are getting posted.
  • Best of all? I connected with so many people. After working so hard for so long to bring Go Away Home to fruition, the reward is putting it into peoples’ hands.

Soon I’ll blog about the virtual book launch that’s been going on in cyberspace this month. For now, I’m happy feeling the local love. 

What is Go Away Home about? Readers weigh in.

One of my college professors spent much of a semester dissecting T.S. Eliot’s poem “The Love-Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” I must admit, I left the classroom on most days shaking my head in dismay. I saw NONE of what the professor talked about.

Writers, painters and sculptors go about creating art out of their own souls. When they share their art with the world, readers and viewers apply their attitudes, emotions, and worldview to the art and create something new. They may see some, all or none of what the creator had in mind.

Now that my novel Go Away Home is out in the world, I’m seeing this happen. Recent reviews by bloggers on the Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tour offered these observations:

Svetlana at Svetlana’s Reads and Views suggested this theme: “There is more to life than satisfying self.”

Svetlana draws comparisons between Go Away Home and stories by Willa Cather and Sarah Orne Jewett who wrote on similar themes of responding to societal expectations versus satisfying self. “… the book is a bit of evolution when it comes to the question of “having it all,” Svetlana says.

“Whether or not the reader has familiarity with the era and what was going on, I found the story to be very resonating as well as relevant and modern,” Svetlana continues. To read more of her comments, click here.

The theme of inequality between women and men and the desire for that to change resonated with Darlene at Peeking Between the Pages

“At a time in history when women were made to accept being only housewives or teachers, she dared to be different and want more for herself,” says Darlene of the novel’s main character Liddie. “Go Away Home will tug at your heart and leave you feeling enriched for having read it.” To read more from Darlene, click here.

Midwest Book Review called it, “… a tale of choices, dreams realized and rejected, and how values evolve.”

Readers’ Favorite said, “Go Away Home is the perfect story of coming home.”

With each reader, I learn more about what I wrote in Go Away Home. Sometimes I find myself thinking, “I had no idea!”

Have you found yourself wondering whether what you took out of a novel or other artwork was what the creator intended? If you’ve read Go Away Home, please share what you think it’s about. I’m curious.

My virtual book tour continues throughout July. For more reviews, giveaways and guest posts on writing historical fiction, check in regularly on my blog tour.Go Away Home_Tour Banner_FINAL

Networking to promote online? Six tips

My Go Away Home virtual tour continues with a stop at Closed The Cover where I’m sharing networking tips for online book promotion. Special thanks to Ashley LaMar for inviting me to share these thoughts.

Since I’m learning something new every day, there are likely many more ways to do this. As I say when I talk about “The Big Brain,” someone’s probably already been down this road and come back with an answer. If you have a good idea, I hope you’ll share – here and when you make the jump to Closed The Cover.

Thanks!

Six Networking Tips to Promote Your Book Online

07/10/2014 

 Guest post written by author Carol Bodensteiner

Social media has created a brave new world for authors to promote themselves and their writing. A new world that is changing by the day.

When I published my memoir Growing Up Country in 2008, Kindle ebooks were brand new, introduced in November 2007, Twitter was two years old, and Facebook was still mainly a platform for college kids. Only innovators and early adopters were stepping into the electronic world of online book promotion. The rest of us were watching and waiting to see if any of it would last.

As I launch my historical novel Go Away Home this month, all doubt has been erased. The world has flipped. Some books are only published as ebooks. Twitter spreads news at lightning speed to people worldwide. Facebook brings together like-minded groups to socialize, support, and educate. Online platforms abound. New ones pop up daily.

As a marketing professional for most of my career, I’ve watched this media evolution and revolution with great interest. I don’t pretend to be an expert in all platforms, but I have found six guidelines useful in using online media to promote my books.

Generalize and specialize: It may be tempting to go broad and talk to everyone or to go narrow and target only your genre. I find some of both is better.

Generalize and specialize – It may be tempting to go broad and talk to everyone or to go narrow and target only your genre. – See more at: http://www.closedthecover.com/articles–news/six-networking-tips-to-promote-your-book-online#sthash.QxawI69U.dpuf

To read more, click:
 

 
Go Away Home by Carol Bodensteiner

Guest post written by author Carol Bodensteiner

Social media has created a brave new world for authors to promote themselves and their writing. A new world that is changing by the day.

When I published my memoir Growing Up Country in 2008, Kindle ebooks were brand new, introduced in November 2007, Twitter was two years old, and Facebook was still mainly a platform for college kids. Only innovators and early adopters were stepping into the electronic world of online book promotion. The rest of us were watching and waiting to see if any of it would last.

As I launch my historical novel Go Away Home this month, all doubt has been erased. The world has flipped. Some books are only published as ebooks. Twitter spreads news at lightning speed to people worldwide. Facebook brings together like-minded groups to socialize, support, and educate. Online platforms abound. New ones pop up daily.
 


 
As a marketing professional for most of my career, I’ve watched this media evolution and revolution with great interest. I don’t pretend to be an expert in all platforms, but I have found six guidelines useful in using online media to promote my books.

– See more at: http://www.closedthecover.com/articles–news/six-networking-tips-to-promote-your-book-online#sthash.prjraZgn.dpuf

 
Go Away Home by Carol Bodensteiner

Guest post written by author Carol Bodensteiner

Social media has created a brave new world for authors to promote themselves and their writing. A new world that is changing by the day.

When I published my memoir Growing Up Country in 2008, Kindle ebooks were brand new, introduced in November 2007, Twitter was two years old, and Facebook was still mainly a platform for college kids. Only innovators and early adopters were stepping into the electronic world of online book promotion. The rest of us were watching and waiting to see if any of it would last.

As I launch my historical novel Go Away Home this month, all doubt has been erased. The world has flipped. Some books are only published as ebooks. Twitter spreads news at lightning speed to people worldwide. Facebook brings together like-minded groups to socialize, support, and educate. Online platforms abound. New ones pop up daily.
 


 
As a marketing professional for most of my career, I’ve watched this media evolution and revolution with great interest. I don’t pretend to be an expert in all platforms, but I have found six guidelines useful in using online media to promote my books.

Generalize and specialize

– See more at: http://www.closedthecover.com/articles–news/six-networking-tips-to-promote-your-book-online#sthash.prjraZgn.dpuf

 
Go Away Home by Carol Bodensteiner

Guest post written by author Carol Bodensteiner

Social media has created a brave new world for authors to promote themselves and their writing. A new world that is changing by the day.

When I published my memoir Growing Up Country in 2008, Kindle ebooks were brand new, introduced in November 2007, Twitter was two years old, and Facebook was still mainly a platform for college kids. Only innovators and early adopters were stepping into the electronic world of online book promotion. The rest of us were watching and waiting to see if any of it would last.

As I launch my historical novel Go Away Home this month, all doubt has been erased. The world has flipped. Some books are only published as ebooks. Twitter spreads news at lightning speed to people worldwide. Facebook brings together like-minded groups to socialize, support, and educate. Online platforms abound. New ones pop up daily.
 


 
As a marketing professional for most of my career, I’ve watched this media evolution and revolution with great interest. I don’t pretend to be an expert in all platforms, but I have found six guidelines useful in using online media to promote my books.

Generalize and specialize

– See more at: http://www.closedthecover.com/articles–news/six-networking-tips-to-promote-your-book-online#sthash.prjraZgn.dpuf

Go Away Home – Blog Tour

Go Away Home_Tour Banner_FINAL

I’m thrilled to announce the participants in a blog tour for Go Away Home taking place from July 8 – July 25, 2014. Please join me from the comfort of your own chair as I travel through cyberspace.

  • Tuesday, July 8 – Amy Bruno at Passages to the Past (and organizer of this month’s virtual book tour) shares a Q&A with me about writing Go Away Home.
  • Wednesday, July 9 – P.C. Zick hosts me on Writing Whims for a wide-ranging Q&A on Author Wednesday
  • Thursday, July 10 – Ashley LaMar at Closed the Cover shares my guest post: “Six Networking Tips to Promote Your Book Online”
  • Monday, July 14 – Svetlana’s Reads and Views shares her review of Go Away Home.
    Darlene at Peeking Between the Pages reviews and hosts a giveaway
  • Tuesday, July 15 – Let Them Read Books hosts a giveaway and my guest post “Fact to Fiction – Researching Historical Fiction Just in Time”
  • Thursday, July 17 – Jorie at Jorie Loves a Story invited me to talk about “choices,” one of the novel themes. Read my guest post: “Is that a good choice? Only time will tell.”
    At the same time, a city girl turned goat farmer reviews & hosts a giveaway at Broken Teepee
  • Friday, July 18 – Kathryn Powell posts a review at A Bibliograph’s Reviews
    Back at Jorie Loves a Story, Jorie shares her review of Go Away Home.
  • Monday, July 21 – Kathleen Kelly posts a review at CelticLady’s Reviews
  • Tuesday, July 22 – Caroline Wilson will shine her spotlight on Go Away Home and offer a giveaway at Caroline Wilson Writes
  • Thursday, July 24 – Returning to Closed the Cover where Ashley LaMar will post a review and host a giveaway
  • Friday, July 25 – Lauralee Jacks does a book review and giveaway at History From a Woman’s Perspective
  • Friday, July 25 –Returning to Passages to the Past where Amy Bruno closes out this month-long blog tour by spotlighting Go Away Home and summarizing blogger reviews

It’s an honor to have so many authors and bloggers participate in sharing the news about the launch of Go Away Home. These sites are full of information about books and authors, writing and life. I encourage you to check them out.

Tips for being in two places at once

The magic of a modern-day book launch.

file0001820510540I’m not in the habit of defying the time/space continuum, but this month I’ll be giving it my best shot. July is the official launch of my World War One-era novel Go Away Home, and the month is packed.

My first event is a library book talk today. The week of July 8, I return to eastern Iowa where I grew up for three events. At the same time, I’ll be zipping through cyberspace making the first four stops on a virtual book tour. The rest of the month repeats the challenge with more blog stops and more in-person events each week. July’s last event (at least that I know about right now) is July 25.

Maybe the best I can hope for is not to meet myself coming and going. I’ve taken these steps to ensure a smooth launch:

  • Written four versions of a presentation that focuses on Writing History. It’s a challenge to anticipate what audiences will want to hear, but my journey from memoir to fiction with an emphasis on the historical commonality seems a good place to start. With four outlines in hand, I can adapt on the go as the presentation evolves based on audience questions.
  • Wrote a multitude of guest posts. Invitations by author/bloggers Shirley Showalter, Annamaria Bazzi, David Lawlor, P.C. Zick (July 9),and Christoph Fischer (Aug 4) to visit their blogs have helped me prepare for interviews, focus my thinking and get the word out. I’m grateful to them for hosting me.
  • Product in place. My eastern Iowa events are in towns without bookstores. Since I know from my memoir experience that people want a local place to buy the book, I’ve arranged with two pharmacies, the county historical society and a library to stock copies.
  • Media outreach. I’ve returned to my public relations roots to prepare media materials and made them available on my website. I’ve targeted pitches to key media for interviews. I’ve made sure local media in the geography surrounding my events have news releases and images well in advance.
  • E-mail marketing. On the theory that people who know me will be most interested in hearing about Go Away Home, I’ve sent a series of targeted e-mails to everyone on my list. The response has been encouraging and sends me forward on a wave of good feelings.

Modern technology is a wonderful thing. Without the Internet, wi-fi, and cell phones, this would not be possible. Time will tell how my body reacts to being in two places at the same time.

No doubt, I’ll arrive at the end of the July exhausted. During the month, I know I’ll have reconnected with old friends, met many new friends, and had a lot of fun.

I think I’m prepared. I hope so. But are there other things I should be doing? If you think of something, let me know. It’s not too late. After all, if I can be in two places, surely three can’t be that difficult 😉

“Wonderful debut novel” – A Writer of History

M.K. Tod started my week off right when she published her review of Go Away Home on her blog A Writer of History. Mary was one of my advance reviewers and I was particularly interested in her opinion since she also writes about the World War One era.

Here’s how she starts her review:

From the very first chapter of Go Away Home, Carol Bodensteiner draws us into the central conflicts of her debut novel: old ways versus new, farm versus city, youth versus maturity, man versus woman.

She continues:

The story flows with excellent dialogue and compelling descriptions, and each chapter ends with a hook that drives the plot forward.

I’m honored that Mary focused both on the story as well as the writing style.

If you like historical fiction, check out M.K. Tod’s novel Unravelled.

Go Away Home – New historical fiction

Go Away Home Final eBook Cover 4-24-14 Large

Go Away Home – A Novel

Start spreading the news! Go Away Home is now available on Amazon and through bookstores.

I’m excited because of what reviewers are saying:

  • The perfect story of coming home.” – Samantha Rivera, Readers’ Favorite 5 Star review
  • Go Away Home is …  gently compelling and highly believable” – D. Donovan, eBook Reviewer, Midwest Book Review
  • Go Away Home is a coming of age novel that is well-written, compelling, and endearing” – Kara Logsden, Iowa City Public Library
  • “… a heart-warming and heart-wrenching tale” – Paulette Mahurin, historical fiction author
  • A poignant, romantic tale …  characters that tug at your heart strings” – David Lawlor, historical fiction author
  • “Bodensteiner … captured the era … with meticulous historical detail” – J.P. Lane, author

Go Away Home – The Story

Liddie Treadway grew up on a family farm where options for her future were marriage or teaching. Encouraged by suffragette rhetoric and her maiden aunt, Liddie is determined to avoid both and pursue a career. Her goal is within her grasp when her older sister’s abrupt departure threatens to keep her on the farm forever.

Once she is able to experience the world she’s dreamed of, Liddie is enthralled with her independence, a new-found passion for photography, and the man who teaches her. Yet, the family, friends, and life of her youth tug at her heart, and she must face the reality that life is not as simple, or the choices as clear-cut, as she once imagined.

GO AWAY HOME is a captivating coming-of-age novel that explores the enduring themes of family, friendship, and love, as well as death and grief. This novel will resonate with anyone who’s confronted the conflict between dreams and reality and come to recognize that getting what you want can be a two-edged sword.

Celebrate with me at launch events throughout July in Iowa and cyberspace.

In person:

  • July 7 – 7 p.m. – Preston Public Library, Preston, Iowa
  • July 8 – 6 p.m. – Clinton Public Library, Clinton, Iowa
  • July 10 – 7 p.m. – Jackson County Historical Society, Maquoketa, Iowa
  • July 18 – 5:30 p.m. – Beaverdale Books, Beaverdale, Iowa

Follow the blog tour – Dates and link posted in July.

Go Away Home_Tour Banner_FINAL

 

 

 

 

To buy now, click on these links:

Go Away Home in paperback             Go Away Home for Kindle

Thanks for letting me be giddy for a bit. Publishing my first novel is, after all, a once in a lifetime experience. Please share this news with anyone who enjoys historical fiction.

Is there serendipity in my geraniums?

GeraniumsMy gardens tend toward shade plants with one exception, a pot that sits on the one consistently sunny point of our deck. That pot is planted with geraniums.

Always geraniums. They like sun. They’re easy. They’re pretty. When the geraniums are planted, I feel as though the summer can really begin.

Over the years, I’ve tried various techniques for overwintering the plants without success.

Last fall, the pink flowers were so pretty, I decided to try again. I moved the geraniums into the basement and charged my husband with watering them every once in a while as he walks by on his way to his office.

Apparently giving the task to him was the way to keep the plants alive. Not only alive, but actively growing all winter. The leaves became so large he thought some strange volunteer plant had invaded. He was only convinced otherwise when the plant began to shoot out flower stalks and set blooms.

The fact that these plants prospered over the winter feels like a good omen to me.

1635 x 2453 image. Download and use as needed.

The cover of my new novel Go Away Home features geraniums on a window sill. When I shared the cover on Facebook, many commented that they liked the cover because of the geraniums: their grandmothers always had geraniums and they think about times past when they see that flower.

Now that it’s warming up, I’m about to move the geraniums back out to the deck. In July, my book will make its public appearance.

It seems like serendipity, doesn’t it, that my geranium plant made it through the winter and that geraniums are on my book cover?

Women’s Fiction – What message does it send?

Consequences of segmenting the author/book market

As a college student in the 1960s, I took a class called “Black Literature.” “Black” being the culturally accepted term of the day for African American. We read works including Native Son by Richard Wright and poetry by Langston Hughes. Though the class was taught by a female professor, we did not read anything by black women authors.file2621283662773

During that same time, courses in women’s literature were offered in the gender studies program.

My thinking at the time was that both “black literature” and “women’s literature” were special and worthy of study. I did not consider that by shining a light on a particular group of authors, the courses may simultaneously elevate and demote those authors.

An article titled “What does ‘Women’s Fiction’ mean?” by Randy Susan Meyers has me thinking more critically of the unintended consequences of segmenting the market.

Meyers observes that: “… to publish on Amazon, you must pick a category from a list of wide ranging possibilities that include ten sub-genres of Women’s Fiction and, zero that are labeled Men’s Fiction. The message is clear. Men are the norm. Women are a sub-category.”

From a marketing standpoint, which given a thirty-year career in marketing is how I think about many things, segmenting the market is a good thing. The closer I can get to finding readers who are interested in my specific product (fiction, World War One-era, United States, family, women), the more efficient my marketing and the more likely I am to achieve a sale.

Amazon marketing is sophisticated, and I’ve benefited greatly from their ability to know that “if you liked this author/book, you’ll like that author/book.” I wouldn’t want them to stop.

At the same time, I know that if Go Away Home is considered “Women’s Fiction,” by default the implication is that men may not find it as interesting. But we can go down the list, if it’s World War One-era fiction, people who do not care about that era may not find it appealing. If it’s United States based, people who want to read about Asia may not choose to give it their time. If it’s fiction, people who only read non-fiction are likely to pass it by.

There is a wealth of good literature out there. How do any of us decide? I admit I’m torn on this topic. I’m not fond of the idea of labeling anyone if it somehow makes them “less.” I am fond of knowing who the reader is because if you market to everybody, you market to nobody.

What do you think readers? Is “Women’s Fiction” denigrating to women authors and even women readers? Or is it a reasonable function of market segmentation?